GF Flour Recipes


Welcome to the World of Gluten-Free Flours!

The easiest thing to do when you are diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten-intolerance is to buy a gluten-free flour blend at a specialty or grocery store. This is perfectly fine if you are cooking occasionally for friends with Celiac or gluten-intolerance. However, if you bake and cook a lot, this can quickly become quite expensive. Learning to create your own “all-purpose” flour blend of non-gluten flours and starches is one way to help control costs.

Most regular wheat-based all-purpose flours weigh 120 to 124 grams per cup. While wheat flour blends are quite consistent, gluten-free blends can vary widely in weight per cup. Whatever gluten-free flour blend you decide to use, just measure out 120 grams to replace each cup of regular flour called for in your recipes and you will be pretty close to perfect on your first try. If your blend does not include xanthan gum or guar gum, you should consider adding 1/4 tsp per cup of flour for most baking projects and 1 tsp per cup of flour for yeast breads.

I personally keep a gluten-free flour blend that I make on hand at all times and use it in place of all-purpose flour in recipes. I have a 6-quart plastic container with a tight fitting lid that holds my AP blend (make sure it is food-safe). I use the recipe from the incredibly talented pastry chef, Silvana Nardone (the first recipe on this page). This is a wonderful neutral-flavored combination that is works well in my baking projects.

Many people include bean flours in their blends to increase the protein and nutrients in their baking. There is a definite bean flavor with these flours that can often be tasted in your baked goods. It doesn’t bother some people but I prefer to use a neutral-flavored combination when making delicately flavored items like sugar cookies, vanilla cakes, etc.

This page contains a sampling of gluten-free all-purpose blends that I have found in cookbooks and online. Feel free to try any of the following or create your own blend. Once you get more comfortable with the flours and their individual characteristics, you can create blends on the fly to suit the products you are baking. Just remember to whisk and/or shake the container very well each time before you measure out your gluten-free flour so that you get a perfectly blended sample.

 

 

My Favorite Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Blend

Silvana Nardone, Editor-in-Chief, Easy Eats.com and Silvana’s Kitchen, author of Cooking for Isaiah

Yield: 4 lb (about 13 cups)

INGREDIENTS

6 cups (870 gr) superfine brown rice flour, preferably Superfine from Authentic Foods (use half white rice/half brown rice for a lighter blend)

3 cups (375 gr) tapioca flour/starch

1-1/2 cups (246 gr)  potato starch (NOT potato flour!)

2 tbsp (17 gr) xanthan gum

1 tbsp (10 gr) salt

 

METHOD

In large bowl, mix all ingredients with whisk until fully incorporated. Transfer to a storage container with a tight lid; seal tightly. Store in cool, dry place or in the refrigerator. Before using, stir or shake to blend the ingredients. Use the scoop and sweep method to measure.

For those who want to add their xanthan gum after mixing or want to avoid it completely, feel free to leave it out.

This flour blend weighs 129 gr per cup. When you are using it in recipes calling for wheat flours, substitute 120 grams or 1 cup minus 1 tbsp of this blend for each cup of flour called for in the recipe.

 

 

Simple Gluten-free Baking Blend

Suite 101.com

This simple baking mix works well in quick breads and drop cookies. For recipes that require rolling out, such as pie crust or cut out cookies, add 1/2 tsp of xanthan gum to the dry ingredients in the recipe.

2 cups white or brown rice flour

1 cup potato starch (not potato flour)

1/2 cup tapioca starch/flour

1-1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum

 

Combine thoroughly and keep in an airtight container. The mix will stay fresh for up to a week in a cool, dry place. For longer storage, refrigerate or freeze.

 

 

 

Versatile Gluten-free Baking Blend

Suite 101.com

 

This baking mix works well in yeast breads and quick breads, pie crust, and all kinds of cookies.

1 cup white or brown rice flour

1 cup potato starch (not potato flour)

1 cup cornstarch

1/2 cup corn flour (not corn meal)

1/2 cup tapioca starch/flour

4 tsp xanthan gum

 

Combine thoroughly and keep in an airtight container. The mix will stay fresh for up to a week in a cool, dry place. For longer storage, refrigerate or freeze.

 

Variation: Replace the cornstarch with arrowroot powder and replace the corn flour with buckwheat or sorghum flour.

 

 

 

Higher Fiber Gluten-free Baking Blend

Suite 101.com

 

Garfava bean flour, a blend of milled garbanzo and fava beans, is available online and in health food stores. Most grain mills will grind beans into flour. Navy beans, garbanzo beans, pinto beans, or a combination of beans work well in this mix.

1 cup brown rice flour

1 -1/2 cups bean flour

1 cup potato starch (not potato flour)

1 cup tapioca starch/flour

1 tbsp xanthan gum

 

Combine thoroughly and keep in an airtight container. The mix will stay fresh for up to a week in a cool, dry place. For longer storage, refrigerate or freeze.

 

 

 

GF All-Purpose Flour Blend

Gluten-Free Cooking

1/2 cup white rice flour

1/4 cup tapioca starch/flour

1/4 cup cornstarch or potato starch

 

Use this blend for all your gluten-free baking. Neutral flavor.

 

 

High-Protein Flour Blend

Gluten-Free Cooking

1-1/4 cups bean flour, chickpea flour or soy flour

1 cup arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch

1 cup tapioca starch/flour

1 cup white or brown rice flour

 

This nutritious blend works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps and pie crusts.

 

 

High-Fiber Flour Blend

Gluten-Free Cooking

1 cup brown rice flour or sorghum flour

1/2 cup teff flour (preferably light)

1/2 cup millet flour or Montina flour

2/3 cup tapioca starch/flour

1/3 cup cornstarch or potato starch

 

This high-fiber blend works for breads, pancakes, snack bars and cookies that contain chocolate, warm spices, raisins or other fruits. It is not suited to delicately flavored recipes such as sugar cookies, crepes, cream puffs, birthday cakes or cupcakes.

 

 

 

Self-Rising Flour Blend

Gluten-Free Cooking

1-1/4 cups white sorghum flour

1-1/4 cups white rice flour

1/2 cup tapioca starch/flour

2 tsp xanthan or guar gum

4 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

 

Use this blend for muffins, scones, cakes, cupcakes or any recipe that uses baking powder for leavening.

 

 

Basic Gluten-Free Baking Blend

From Paula at Live Free, Gluten Free

3 cups sweet rice flour

3 cups gluten-free oat flour

2 cups potato starch

1 cup tapioca starch

1-1/2 tbsp xanthan gum


Whisk together in a large bowl and store in an airtight container.  Use in place of all-purpose flour in cookie recipes.

I really love the blend of the sweet rice with the oat, but if you don’t like it or don’t have these flours on hand, you can sub and experiment.  The important part is keeping these ratios.  So you could use all brown rice in place of the sweet rice and oat, or use a 50:50 mix of sorghum and millet, or a white rice/brown rice mix, etc. As long as you keep the flour/starch/xanthan gum ratios the same, the possibilities are endless.

 

 

Jeanne’s Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Mix

Jeanne Sauvage, The Art of Gluten-Free Baking

1-1/4 cup (170 gr) brown rice flour

1-1/4 cup (205 gr) white rice flour

1 cup (120 gr) tapioca flour

1 cup (165 gr) sweet rice flour (also known as glutinous rice flour or by brand name Mochiko)

2 scant tsp xanthan gum

 

Mix together and store in a cool, dark place, or in fridge for long-term storage. 1 cup of this mix equals 140gr. Use this mix cup-for-cup or gram-for-gram in all of your recipes.

 

 

 

Jeanne’s GF Self-Rising Flour

Jeanne Sauvage, The Art of Gluten-Free Baking

1 cup Jeanne’s Gluten-Free All Purpose Flour Mix, above (or mix of your choice)

1-1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

 

Mix together and use as needed. Can be doubled, tripled, etc.

 

This mixture can be made ahead of time and stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place or in the fridge. It will expire when the baking powder expires, so you might want to mark the expiration date found on the baking powder container onto your self-rising flour container.